Believe In Bunnies

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rabbit

Bunnies Rescue

Theodora

It’s about time that you meet Theodora.

We started by taking the overflow when the usual bunny-sitters were booked. Then, the bunny-sitters moved to Florida so there was more need for our services. We have a finished basement and we always have a bale of hay in the garage, so bunny-sitting on occasion fits in well for us. When we were watching Spice and Harley a few years ago, their mom coined the name Camp Bee… and it stuck.

Theodora came to Camp Bee just before Halloween 2019. Her mom was moving and wanted Theodora safely out of the standard chaos of a move so she booked a long-weekend stay at Camp Bee. Unexpected hurdle after hurdle, some bordering disaster, came flying at Theodora’s mom in what was supposed to be a standard move from one home to another. I reassured her that her little lop was fine here for as long as she needs to be. That’s part of the magic of our Rescue family.

Theodora, being the longest running camper at Camp Bee, deserves a little shout out here today.

When she was with our Rescue group, her name was Faith. She came into our care with an almost-identical twin sister, whose name was originally Hope but changed to Joy since we already had a Hope on our roster. These sisters were purchased from a pet store or breeder; the exact detail eludes me. They came into our care because Hope-turned-Joy had chronic digestive issues that the owners could not manage. Joy required daily medication, special diet, and frequent hospitalization. She suffered from a condition called megacolon. Despite our interventions, Joy did not survive.

Faith got lots of foster family and volunteer love as she mourned the loss of her sister. Not long after Joy’s passing, a former adopter of ours texted me. She saw Faith’s picture on our website. Having lost her lop Matilda several months before, she was ready to open her heart again. We arranged a meeting at my house, in the finished basement now known as Camp Bee.

She was adopted that night. Love at first hop… renamed Theodora shortly after adoption.

During her extended stay here at Camp Bee, Theodora has been an absolute dream. Where our own Peanut will bite your face off if you try to snuggle him, Theodora is gentle, tolerant of all sorts of snuggles, and even takes grooming without so much as a grunt! She runs around her penned area, lop ears flopping in the breeze, the occasional binky-kick-turn. We’ve nicknamed her Breadstick, Sticky, and Lil’ Beanie. She adores the Bunny-Daddy and runs to greet him with the most adorable fervor, even when he doesn’t have a bowl of salad in his hands.

She might go home today, as her mom’s living situation has course-corrected, or she might stay longer. I’m in no rush to see her go. She’s a perfect little camper and we are glad to have been able to help when she needed a place to rest her little paws.

Much love.

Theodora

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Believe Bunnies Purpose Rescue

Throwback: Lessons Learned

Enjoy this throwback post from February 2016 titled Lessons Learned

Have I learned and worked the lessons? Something to reflect on today!

I’ve learned so much about rabbits in my nearly four years as a volunteer for the Long Island Rabbit Rescue… but I’ve learned even more about people.

I’ve observed volunteers of all ages and walks of life care for rabbits that we’ve saved from brutal neglect situations with inspiring love, yet neglect their own selves—“burning out” from taking on too much or simply not feeding and caring for themselves the way they do our foster and sanctuary rabbits.  These women and men would never let a rabbit go hungry or feed a rabbit a less than balanced, nutritious diet, but they don’t take the time to nurture themselves.  They make sure every foster and sanctuary rabbit gets daily exercise time to run, hop and play—but they don’t seem to prioritize themselves.  As dedicated volunteers, we recognize how much these gentle creatures need us.  If only we remembered that we are gentle creatures too.  Sometimes we need a little treat or a softer rug to rest our paws too.  For my fellow volunteers, I wish you would “cover a shift” in caring for yourself.  I am so blessed to work with each of you.  Please take care of you, too.

I’ve talked with hundreds of people, almost always parents of young children, who are looking to rehome their rabbit, in whom their children lost interest or for whom the family feels they can’t (or don’t want to) care anymore. These people are often ashamed to ask for help.  They perceive a failure in what they were wrongly told was a simple task—to care for a prey animal like a rabbit.  So many times, if people are open to our support, we are able to make life better for the rabbit and manageable for the family.  It’s important to see our commitments through, for our own strength and for our pet’s existence.  For these people, I wish them faith in themselves and the strength to ask for support.  Making positive changes in the current home or finding a new home will take work, for sure, but these innocent rabbits deserve the dedication!

And for all considering bringing an animal in their lives, do your research.  If you want something that’s easy to care for and something that won’t suffer when your children move on to the next interest, please buy a stuffed toy.  Please don’t use a living thing to teach a lesson, unless you are completely committed yourself to seeing that lesson through.

That said, I’ve learned so much in these four years of giving to the abandoned and neglected rabbits of Long Island.  From these fragile creatures, I’ve learned that I need space, too.  Sometimes there’s nothing more blissful than tossing the task at hand to this side (for me, returning some emails, for the bunnies, a woven grass toy or cardboard tube) and flopping out for a nap.

Sometimes it’s scary to hop somewhere new, but you might just find your favorite spot that way.  You also might find danger there, so sniff a lot first.  And use your whiskers as your guide.

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Believe Bunnies Purpose Rescue

A Problem & A Fix

Loyal readers know by now that I’m the main point of contact for a volunteer animal rescue organization called the Long Island Rabbit Rescue Group.  Earlier this week, we received a remarkable number of emails from people who are looking to get rid of their rabbits. We call this rehoming, but that’s often a soft euphemism. I wrote a post in our volunteer group that day that went deeper than our usual posts there. I decided to save it and share it with you today, a look into that side of my Rescue world.

Here’s what I had to say to our team:

 

Education. That’s how we “fix” this problem.

I don’t tell you any of this to upset you or to anger you. I share with you so we can support each other in our shared mission of ensuring the safety and protection of domestic rabbits.

Today alone LIRRG received emails about 28 unwanted rabbits. 28. Today. On Long Island. Some from “accidental litters” that could have been prevented with education.

These people reach out to us, trying to do the “right thing” by an animal either they no longer want, no longer can care for or were just plain not expecting… but we have no recourse for them. Even if we had a shelter facility, it would be filled by the end of the week. And no, the Town shelters typically do not accept rabbits, as they are not equipped to care for them. Yet the towns and counties still allow the sale. I wonder if our representatives know there is even an issue…

I know where these rabbits are coming from. We ask those who email us and they tell us. None of these people welcomed rabbit(s) into their lives planning on getting rid of him/her/them. But, with few exceptions, they were not given accurate or any information upon purchase. They also chose not to do any research before purchase… but if there was a chance that the shirt I bring up to the register at Macy’s was going to chew my couch and potentially multiply into 15 shirts, I think it would be the staff or management’s job to let me know that.

We need to get out in FULL FORCE to educate, to teach about proper care, spay/neuter and the benefits of adoption over shopping. Although we are making a difference, the problem is multiplying like… well, like rabbits.

Sure, you rather stay home on a Saturday than staff a table at an education. Sure, you rather text your bestie than email your legislatures. But, I am also sure that you look over at the exercise pen in your family room and know that your rabbit would want you to get involved on behalf of his/her/their furry friends.

 

So, dear readers, maybe you’re not a rabbit owner or lover… but there are some beings in your life that you love, including yourself! In honor of that love and care, do something today to make the world safer and brighter… send a “thinking of you” text, donate $10 to your local animal rescue, treat yourself to a 10 minute massage. Spread love.

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Bunnies Energy Purpose

Hoppy 8th Birthday Peanut!

Our little monster turned 8 this past week. He may be cruising into his senior years, but he hasn’t slowed down a bit! He runs his laps around the couch, often to evade me. He chews holes in the corners of the couch cushions. He’s still working on remodeling the molding between the living room and entrance way.

And I love him more and more every day.

He’ll probably never be a snuggle bunny. Most rabbits aren’t, despite their stuffed animal-esque appearance. But Peanut has mellowed a bit in his advancing age. I get bitten far less often than before. I must admit, even when the bites were more frequent, they were never unprovoked. He never attacks without cause, unless of course you’re an aromatic piece of hay or frond of parsley.

Peanut has been spending a lot more time on the couch than he used to. When he perches on the arm rest, I do get a little nervous… but he gets his balance talent from me and his explorative nature from the Bunny Daddy.

We didn’t do much to celebrate his 8th birthday in particular because we’ve learned to celebrate every single day, not just the designated occasions.

When we lost his brother Tater Tot, two years ago this Tuesday (wow that was alliterative), I became very resentful and mad at myself for every moment I spent looking at my dumb phone rather than paying attention to Tater. I regretted every second that I spend engaged in something inane when I could have been snuggling the Tot. I can’t get that time back.

In the heartbreak, I gained understanding and awareness. From that awareness, I make an effort to be more present with Peanut and with everyone in my life. It’s a practice, not a perfect. I sometimes find myself caught up in the inconsequential, the mindless scrolling more often than I like, but I realign quickly and forgive myself.

Now, if you’ll forgive me, I have an 8-year-old fluffy bunny to attend to. Much love.

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Believe Bunnies Energy Purpose Reiki Rescue

Throwback: Why Rabbits?

I came across this gem that I wrote in October of 2016… and I love how every word is still true (or truer) today. Enjoy this throwback.

I’ve been asked the question “Why rabbits?” in a variety of contexts over the five years that I’ve been a bunny-mom and subsequently a rescuer.  I typically blink thrice and answer something along the lines of “uh, because… they are awesome.”  I’m sure I’ve given some more constructive answers when the asker is deserving of a quality response.  You, my darling readers, are deserving of a response, although many of you have your own “why” when it comes to our cotton-bottom babies.

Why rabbits…

  • Because the bunny-daddy and I live for our boys. They are the light of our lives.  Even when they are posing as bunstruction workers, Peanut and Tater Tot are the center of our world.    They turn 5 years old this month!

  • Because rabbits are the third most popular pet in America.

  • Because rabbits are the third most abandoned, neglected and abused animal in America.

  • Because, whether the day is sunshiny or downright dreadful, rabbits can always make you smile.

  • Because I can be their voice. As much as they understand us, they still can’t speak back with words.  With nose bonks, snuggles and sometimes grunts, they can though!

  • Because, and this “why” is highly personal, I’ve never felt more alive doing anything in my personal or professional life as I do when I’m giving a rabbit Reiki session, tending to chores at one of our foster homes or just lying on the floor with one of our boys.

  • Because it’s empowering to make a difference… and we are making a beautiful difference in the lives of these bunnies.

That’s how Rescue and Reiki have come together so gloriously for me.  There are tangible tasks, like catching a stray or cleaning a litter box, and there is energy work that heals, comforts and connects.  Put it all together and that’s why.  Why rabbits?  I can’t give you a point of peripety.  There wasn’t just one moment where time stopped and I was showered in golden light (well, now that I write that, there have been a number of moments like that… but we’ll save that topic for another day).  But it is rabbits.  Unequivocally.  I work for them, on the front lines, in the back office and in my energetic field all day, every day.  This hop cannot be stopped.  And I’d love to hear “Why rabbits” for you—please share in the comments!  Much love.

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angels Believe Bunnies Rescue

Some Rabbit Stories

I feel like I haven’t told you a rabbit story in a while…

That’s probably because I don’t feel like I own the stories as much as I used to. I feel very behind-the-scenes in Rescue… and I am NOT complaining. In fact, I prayed for this. I set very clear intentions with the Universe that the core group of volunteers, who were doing everything when I started helping out, would be matched by a team equal in passion, dedication and purpose and bigger in size.

Dreams come true. Intentions, with consistent work behind them, manifest.

Wednesday night, I sat in front of the computer screen, broadcasting to our group of volunteers and supporters about the various events of the day. I’m a fan of sharing as much of what’s going on as possible—clear communication is the foundation of making it work!

On Wednesday, on top of the day-to-day business of feeding and caring for foster rabbits, veterinary appointments and the like, we had a particularly active day. All at once:

-an adopter who lives well over an hour from the vet’s office needed a ride to said vet’s office, as her rabbit stopped eating. She doesn’t drive. Within minutes of asking for help, a volunteer arranged to drive her to and from an emergency appointment.

-we rescued a bunny who had been living outside for 3 years!! Outside for even 3 minutes in our climate/environment is dangerous. This rabbit had, of late, become the chew toy of the family’s new dog when the dog went outside to poop or play. That’s the short version of the story, as you can imagine. The rabbit is safe now.

-a rabbit who has been in our foster care for a bit over a year was diagnosed with cancer. Angel’s foster mother noticed that she hasn’t been finishing her food and hasn’t been very active. A volunteer took Angel in for a checkup and the doctor diagnosed Angel with cancer. X-rays show that it has metastasized in her chest. Now, we do everything we can to keep her comfortable… and dream of some angel of a person to show up and give her a forever home for whatever time she has left.

-a team of volunteers went out to rescue what was reported as two abandoned rabbits in a residential neighborhood in Suffolk County. Upon arrival, our team found out that these rabbits belonged to someone on the block who was not caring for them and letting them run in the street. The “owner” grabbed both rabbits in one hand and tossed them to our volunteers. Our group is unable to accept owner surrenders… but this wasn’t a typical surrender. These two rabbits, both male, are in rough shape, underweight, covered in bite marks and dirt. Their foster family is caring for them, teaching them to trust and making sure they have lots of delicious greens and hay to eat.

Those four situations, on top of the everyday operations, made for an energetically overwhelming day. But we’ve curated such a phenomenal team of volunteers and supporters… everything worked out the best it possibly could. I was able to focus and “call the plays,” capitalizing on my innate organizational skills. The team was able to execute and do the best we could for the greatest good. Then, I got to hop onto a Facebook Live and recap the day to our group of volunteers and supporters.

I am honored and humbled to work alongside such loving and dedicated people. Much love!

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Believe Bunnies Coaching Energy Purpose

Instinct & Acceptance

My coach’s coach says, “Your spiritual DNA is perfect.” He’s talking about you. And you. And every being.

On that note, I’m thinking about instinct and acceptance.

When Tater Tot was alive, he loved to snuggle, to dill eat and to rip up the living room carpet. He would tear out the fibers one by one, leaving a neat pile of carpet adjacent to a hole, like his wild relatives must do to grass and plants. Thankfully, Tater did not ingest those fibers. Thankfully, our landlord did not charge us to replace the carpet when we moved out, although it certainly needed to be ripped up (finish Tater’s job!) and replaced.

One of his smaller projects

Our little Tater Tot did not tear holes of various shapes and sizes in our brown and tan carpet to misbehave. He wasn’t trying to ruin or even redecorate our living room. He was operating on instinct, flowing from his perfect spiritual DNA.

Occasionally frustrated and always amazed at how he would find the one place we didn’t cover with cardboard or at just how much he could dig and tear in the 15 seconds I left the room, I found acceptance at our little guy’s instinct. He was operating in the way he was programmed. I’m sure he would have preferred some herbs to tear and eat. He accepted the carpet as the best his environment would provide for him. I accepted that his instinct was perfect. Sure, we tried to recondition him with lots of toys, a dig box, blankets… but little man just needed to rip up carpet.

And so it goes.

Interestingly, when we moved to our current home, Tater Tot did not rip one fiber out of the new rug. The couch, however, became the target. He began to chew a hole in the back corner of the couch, a legacy project his brother Peanut has continued.

Legacy Project

Our companion animals are unapologetically themselves. Their design, although different from ours, is still perfect. They are driven by instinct. How many times have you ignored “your gut” when it turns out that you knew what to do all along? How many times have you changed an answer on a test, hesitated at an opportunity, sensed that you shouldn’t make a turn… then ignored that knowing, that urge, that nagging? And now you look back…

You can’t change your past decisions but you can decide today to accept your instinct as truth. Channel your inner Tater Tot… just be prepared to replace the rug.

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Believe Bunnies Healing Purpose Rescue

Paddington

For everyone celebrating something today, I wish you and yours a happy one.

I had the honor of spending yesterday with a very special boy, local celebunny Paddington.

 

In a town in central Nassau county, about two months ago, a woman found a domestic rabbit in her yard. She was able to pick him up and bring him inside. She bought him food and cared for him the best she could for a few weeks. In the interim, and completely unrelated to Paddington’s arrival, this kind woman lost her job. She reached out to us at the Long Island Rabbit Rescue Group when she noticed she was running low on food for the rabbit she found. We coordinated a volunteer to bring food and other supplies she may need while she was fostering. We also planned to start the process of finding this rabbit a forever home.

Our volunteer went to the finder’s house that evening. She texted me shortly after she arrived there and said, “I’m taking him.” I hope she doesn’t get mad at me for sharing this… but she was crying. And this is a volunteer who works in animal rescue and rehabilitation professionally, someone who sees extremely tough stuff on a daily basis. One look at the rabbit we now know as Paddington brought her to tears… because of his ears.

Our volunteer remarked to the finder about the rabbit’s ears and the finder acknowledged that they are very short (I love and protect her innocence… she didn’t realize why). She found Paddington that way. By the time she found and saved him, his ears healed from being crudely chopped off. Sorry to hit you with such a stark reality on this Sunday, and for some holy, morning.

Paddington

In case you are wondering if this wasn’t a result of human cruelty… in Rescue we seeing plenty of ear injuries caused by other animals, endured before rescue and safety. Check out Shark, for example. Then compare his ear to Paddington’s ears. This is what moved our volunteer to tears and to take him with her. The finder was very grateful as she was struggling to care for the rabbit she found.

Despite the trauma he endured, Paddington settled in quickly and comfortably at his foster home. When I put out the call for a spokesbunny for an education and photo event at Pet Supplies Plus in Deer Park yesterday, Paddy’s foster mom volunteered him… and what a great choice he was! He was comfortable, even when three St. Bernard’s pounded into the store, and friendly with all of his fans. He enjoyed snuggles from store patrons and staff and even showed the Easter Bunny who is the boss!

Paddington 2

From her plans to drop off food and assess supply needs to becoming Paddington’s foster mom in a blink of time, my incredible colleague and her family have embraced this dear little one with pure love. I suspect, after Paddington’s neuter surgery tomorrow, that they just might make him an official part of their family.

LIRRG Family.

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Believe Bunnies Energy Purpose

Hungry?

I call Peanut my son but it’s no secret that we aren’t the same species. In being different species, we have different needs. His diet should be 80% grass hay; mine should be 0% hay. He should have unlimited access to hay. I also have unlimited access to hay, but it’s mostly in my shoes or tousled in my hair.

We both drink lots of water. His treats are an occasional bite of apple, banana or a “doodle,” our code word for a particular type of food pellet that is sweeter than most. You can equate it to a Lucky Charms type cereal as opposed to, say, Grape Nuts. He gets very few “doodles.” My treats vary and are often excessive in quantity.

If he misses a meal, we have a massive emergency on our hands. If I miss a meal, I’ll be just fine.

Thankfully, and despite his excessive fur and dwarf stature, Peanut has only gone into stasis once in 7 years. Knock on every available hard surface…

I’ve been thinking a lot about my own food consumption lately. It’s been a struggle for most of my life—I don’t know when to stop, just as Peanut would likely feel if we left him alone with the jar of “doodles.”

Peanut's jar of Doodles

Our relationship to food as a culture is interesting… How often do we use food to cope? To celebrate? To mask?

Are you hungry or are you eating just because it’s “lunchtime”? What are you feeding yourself? Maybe if you get sick, bloated, uncomfortable every time you eat _____, it’s time to give it up? Replace it with something that makes you energized? Just a thought…

And speaking of feeding… what are you feeding your mind and soul with? If things you are consuming on television or social media make you feel anxious, angry or sad consistently, it just might be time to change the channel or close the app. If you’re like me, you may not even realize the feelings that the content you are consuming stirs in you. Take today to be conscious of it. It’s absolutely okay, and sometimes necessary, to indulge. But why waste time with food, content, people, anything that doesn’t make you feel and perform your best?

Peanut, catching up on RHOC

It’s okay to indulge sometimes!

Here’s your homework: Contemplate and journal about the following questions.

What are you hungry for? And why are you hungry for that?

Pay attention to the “food noise” and how what you are consuming, on and off the plate, is making you feel. Reach for the greatest feeling. It’s always possible.

And never forget to eat your hay. Much love.

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Believe Bunnies Purpose Rescue

Linus

My business mentor the incomparable MP reminds us often to “keep the main thing the main thing.” If you’re a loyal reader, you know what’s at the center of my vision board that hangs above the center of my desk. If you’re new here, I won’t keep you in the metaphorical dark. At the center of my vision board it says: Domestic rabbits are safe and protected.

That’s my main thing. That’s what my heart beats for. That’s my life’s purpose.

Yesterday, I helped coordinate the rescue of Linus. I share his story with you today in hopes that one day that sentence in the center of my vision board comes true.

Here’s what I wrote for the Long Island Rabbit Rescue Group’s Facebook page:

Some days in Rescue are more difficult than others. We don’t share these stories and pictures to make you angry or sad; we share these stories to increase awareness, in hopes that no more rabbits have to suffer like Linus is right now.

Just before the weekend, we received an email from a man who found a lop-eared rabbit who had been abandoned in eastern Suffolk County. After several exchanges, we were able to ascertain that the rabbit had an injury to his mouth, so this case became a priority among the dozens we are alerted to weekly.

With no available foster space, we turned to the Town of Brookhaven Animal Shelter. Like most shelters on Long Island, they aren’t typically set up to accept rabbits but they have been remarkably gracious and generous with helping many rabbits lately. The finder brought this little injured lop to the shelter yesterday just before closing… and the rabbit’s condition was worse than anticipated. He got immediate medical attention and we are grateful to the doctors and staff at the shelter.

He has a hole through his face and jaw. His underside is inflamed and possibly infected. He cannot eat on his own. Our volunteers who met him said that all he wanted was snuggles and kisses despite the pain he must be feeling.

Due to his extremely fragile condition, Linus, named by the volunteers, is spending a few days in a medically-equipped foster home. If Linus survives these critical days, he will be in search of a foster home to help him recuperate.

Someone did this to him. A person, possibly out of ignorance, let him “go.” Now Linus is fighting for his life.

Hundreds of rabbits are abandoned on Long Island every year. Not all are as lucky as Linus to have a second chance.

To donate toward his care, visit http://longislandrabbitrescue.org/index.htm and click Donate on the right.

Share his story. Thank you for your support.

 

 

 

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